Ofsted Inspections – October 2018 – Governors

In this series of articles we have a look at Ofsted's Inspections for the month of October 2018, where a school's overall rating was "Requires Improvement". In this article, we have a look at the role of the governor and how Ofsted comments on this. Let's start with a positive. Some Ofsted inspectors commented on how well governors know the school: Governors know the school well. They are highly skilled and contribute positively. Governors have a sound grasp of the school’s key strengths and weaknesses. The recent changes to the leadership of the school have meant that governors receive timely and transparent information. Governors are insightful, well informed and realistic. They know the school and the community that it serves well. They are ambitious for the school. They are well led and constantly seeking to improve. Governors are a united and highly committed team who play an important and very visible role in the life of the school. Governors now meet with school leaders regularly, visit classrooms...
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Ofsted Inspections – October 2018 – Key Stage 2 Attainment

In this article series, we'll be looking at some of the "Outcomes for pupils" in Ofsted Judgements, in order to see what Ofsted inspectors are concentrating on. Specifically, we'll look at those judgements which overall were requires improvement. In this article, we'll be looking at comments regarding the end of Key Stage 2 Attainment from the 50 judgements released in October 2018. Figures in brackets relate to the number of comments made, and there may be more than one reference in a particular judgement. Attainment - Expected Standard There was naturally a high emphasis on the percentage of pupils getting the Expected Standard in Key Stage 2. Some comments (5) concentrated on reading, writing and maths combined: The proportion of pupils achieving the combined expected standard in reading, writing and mathematics at the end of Year 6 has improved but is still below the national average. and sometimes there was a comparison with previous year or years: Provisional results for 2018 show improvements ... but.continues to...
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Primary IDSR – Areas to Investigate

In previous articles, we have looked at other pages in Ofsted's Inspection Data Summary Report (IDSR). In this article, we'll look at the first page, "Areas to investigate". In 2016, this used to be called "Strengths and Weakness", but is basically the same thing, categorized by Key Stage. Early Years and Phonics In 2017 there were no "Areas to Investigate" regarding Early Years, either the Good Level of Development or Early Learning Goals (despite there having been 2 Strengths and 1 Weakness in 2016). In 2017 there were 3 Areas to Investigate regarding Year 1 Phonics (90% or above, below 70%, and if more than 10 pupils do not pass), and none regarding Year 2 Phonics. Key Stage 1 For Key Stage 1, the following can be included in your "Areas to Investigate" for maths, reading or writing (note: not science): Attainment in SUBJECT was above average and in the highest 10%. below average and in the lowest 10%. at or above national for the...
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Primary IDSR – Pages 2 to 4

In the previous articles in this series, we had a look at EYFSP, Phonics, Key Stage 1 and 2 Attainment, Key Stage 2 Progress and Scattergraphs. In this article, we'll have a look at the remaining pages in the IDSR, pages 2 to 4. Key Stage 2 Trends over time Page 4 of your IDSR shows how your school has done compared to other schools over time. This shows a percentile ranking, from 1 to 100. A "1" means that you are in top 1% of schools, and a "100" means that you are in the bottom 1% of schools. Again, figures are greyed out if the cohort size is under 11, as Ofsted will not use results from such a small cohort size in isolation. But beware - if your cohort size is between 6 and 10, then Ofsted may use this data if they are looking at trends. Additionally, figures have a green box if they are significantly above average, and red if...
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Primary IDSR – Key Stage 2 Scatterplots

In our previous articles, we looked at how Key Stage 1 and 2 Attainment and Key Stage 2 Progress is shown in the IDSR. In this article, we'll have a look at the Key Stage 2 progress and attainment Scatterplots or Scattergraphs are shown, and why. Progress Scatterplots In the scattergraphs there is: Key Stage 1 Average Points Score going across, with a score of 12 to 17.99 representing your Middle Prior Attainers, and Pupils' progress scores going up and down. For example, the pupil who is circled has a Key Stage 1 Average Point Score of 21 – that's level 3. For more details, please see our KS1 APS article. This Level 3 pupil got a progress score of approximately minus 13. This pupil, from the key at the bottom, is a non-disadvantaged boy who does not have SEN. How can you read these scatterplots? We generally divide them into 4 sections: The green section represents pupils who made much higher than expected...
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How is Key Stage 2 Progress calculated?

In our series about the IDSR we had a look at how your school's Key Stage 2 Progress scores are shown in the IDSR in chart form, and the significance of your school's progress scores. In this article, we'll have a look at the calculation Your pupil's Scaled Scores In May, most of your pupils take exams in Reading, Writing and Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling. Their marks (also known as a "raw score") is then converted into a "scaled score" between 80 and 120, where 100 is a pass mark and 110 is a high score - the DfE decides after the exams how the scaled score conversion is to be done. For the pupils that didn't take the test, then your Teacher Assessment is converted in a Scaled Score of between 59 to 79. In 2017 and 2018, the conversion was as follows: Scaled scores P1i to P4 - between 59 and 61. Scaled scores P5 to P8 - between 63 and...
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Primary IDSR – Key Stage 2 Progress Significance

In the previous article in this series, we had a look at how Key Stage 2 progress is represented in the IDSR. We saw that: The central dot represents your school's progress score, and The line represents a calculation of the cohort's confidence interval. In this article, we'll look at how Ofsted interprets this, and what significance it has to your school. Significance So how do we interpret these shapes? If the entirety of these shapes, the dot and the line, is to the right of the zero line, then your school is, in old money, significantly above average. If it is entirely to the left of the zero line, then you are significantly below average. If it even just touches the line, and you see that the Middle Prior Attainers just touches the line, then you are neither significantly above, nor significantly below – you are in line with the National Average. I say that this is old terminology, because nowadays there are...
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Primary IDSR – Key Stage 2 Progress charts

In the previous articles, we had a look at the Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2 attainment charts. In this article, we'll have a look at the Key Stage 2 progress charts. On the right-hand side is a typical progress chart - there is one for Reading, Writing and Maths. There are 5 different types of cohort: All Pupils, Low Prior Attaining Pupils (pupils with a Key Stage 1 Average Point Score below 12), Middle Prior Attaining Pupils (a KS1 APS between 12 and 17.99), and High Prior Attaining Pupils (a KS1 APS of 18 or above), and Disadvantaged pupils. More information about how your pupils' Key Stage 1 is calculation can be found in our How is Key Stage 2 Progress calculated article. The progress score for this school overall is +1.3. What does that mean? For each pupil: We look at their Scaled Score from their test or Teacher Assessment. We have a look at the National Average for all...
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Primary IDSR – Key Stage 1 and 2 Diff No column

In the previous article, we had a look at the Key Stage 1 and 2 attainment analysis in Ofsted's Inspection Data Summary Report. However, there was one column that we didn't look at: the "Diff no" column. In this article, we'll see what it is so important, using a Key Stage 1 example, and how it is used in conjunction with your Key Stage 1 Emerging, Expected and Exceeding cohorts. Key Stage 1 and 2 - "Diff no" column The remaining column is the "Diff no" column. Taking the top line, we have the School's figures of 88%, a National figure of 76%, and a "Diff no" of 6 – but 88 less 76 is not equal to 6. So, what is that Diff no column? It's clearly not a percentage difference. It is the difference in number of pupils – this school is 6 pupils above the National average. But how is that worked out? Let's take an example: Number of pupils: 46. School attainment:...
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Primary IDSR – Key Stage 1 and 2 Attainment Charts

In this series of articles about Ofsted's Inspection Data Summary Report (IDSR), this article is about the attainment charts contained in Key Stages 1 and 2, using Key Stage 1 as an example. Key Stage 1 charts The Key Stage 1 charts are for Reading, Writing and Maths. Your school's results are still the bars, but this time they are going across instead of down. For all cohorts there are: the lighter blue bars, which is the Expected Standard or above, and the darker blue bars, which is the Greater Depth standard. Your pupils are divided into five different cohorts: All pupils are being compared with the National All Pupils average – 76% (Expected Standard or above) and 25% (Greater Depth standard). Emerging, Expected and Exceeding cohorts For Key Stage 1, it also includes the following: Emerging - pupils who got the Emerging assessment in the Early Years for reading; Expected - pupils who got the Expected assessment in Early Years; and Exceeding - pupils...
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