Learning Loss – A Discussion

In this video, presented by our Senior Principal Analyst - Phillip Burton, we look at the context of school closures, some of the studies regarding learning loss and how it can be measured, and offer a resource to enable you to measure what has taken place. https://youtu.be/-zOum1ew_GU http://daisi.education/learning-loss/ Here at DAISI Education, we are working hard to find ways of handling learning loss through our Question Level Analysis both for Primary and Secondary Schools. Using exam papers from previous years when students return to your schools, we can give you detailed analysis of their learning gaps and allow you work to minimise learning loss immediately. Our analysis includes individual pupil profiles showing clear topic strengths and weaknesses in the key areas of English and Maths. Together we can enable pupils to pick up their learning at a point that is right for them and continue working towards achieving their potential. DAISI Education Question Level Analysis ...
Read More

Learning Loss

In these new and uncertain times, pupils will have spent many months away from school due to the closures put in place as a result of Covid-19. Schools in England were closed to all pupils except those of key-workers and vulnerable children on the 20th March and have only reopened to certain pupils in the last few weeks. Learning has been disrupted and will have been lost. As this is an unprecedented situation in the UK, there is no previous research that can show us what the educational impact of COVID-19 school closures might be. Never in our lifetimes have so many schools been closed for so many children. We prize attendance in our schools and often use posters like this to make children and parents aware of why time at school is so important. But what happens if the whole school is closed and everyone stops attending? Has this happened before..? Closed Schools Studies of previous school closures abroad show a real negative...
Read More

Home Learning

**UPDATED TODAY Science Experiments Fun Activities UPDATED TODAY** Fun Activities with your child at home.. "So many ideas to beat the boredom & have a ton of fun!"  Online Educational Resources Check out these links for free resources, daily lessons and more for Primary and Secondary age. Early Years Activities and links for those at home with 2-5 year olds from Storytime to colouring to crafts and more.. Get Outdoors Studies have shown that kids who spend more time outside might be happier and more relaxed. Science Experiments to do at Home Make something amazing and learn as you do it. Create giant bubbles and a rocket that blasts off! Online Videos and guides. Discover Something Amazing Find out more about the world we live in. Fascinating facts about Space, animals, humans plus live cams and games.. Tour the World and Beyond Visit Space or take a tour of some of the most famous places on Earth – from the Pyramids to Buckingham Palace. Reading Activities Whether its a online...
Read More

Year 7 Transition QLA – A Flying Start

What helps pupils make a successful Transition to Secondary School? We surveyed secondary schools up and down the country asking about Transition. Every school and area has a different way of working. Some involve days in school and others involve immediate testing. Some can involve both. However, if you are looking for a way to make immediate progress with your new Year 7 pupils - nothing beats Question Level Analysis. Your new Year 7 pupils have already taken six standardised tests in May. The KS2 SATs give a validated indication of each of your students strengths and weaknesses and the results are available every year - broken down to performance in each individual question. With appropriate analysis, this can prove to be a fantastic tool to help secondary staff bridge the progress gap that exists across KS3. A recent report into how data was used in schools showed that whilst 62% of teachers said that KS2 results are used to set...
Read More

Marginal Gains – Big Journeys begin with Small Steps

Back in 2012, at the heart of London Olympics, Sir Dave Brailsford repeatedly told people of his belief in the marginal gains principle. Speaking to the BBC, he said “The whole principle came from the idea that if you broke down everything you could think of, that goes into riding a bike, and then improved it by 1%, you will get a significant increase when you put them all together.  There’s fitness and conditioning, of course, but there are other things that might seem on the periphery, like sleeping in the right position, having the same pillow when you are away and training in different places. They’re tiny things but if you clump them together it makes a big difference.” Brailsford believed that if it were possible to make a 1% improvement in a whole host of areas, the cumulative gains would end up being hugely significant. This principle has guided and driven the cycling team to great heights and Brailsford’s...
Read More

Year 7 Catch-up Premium

How well is your school using the additional funding for pupil premium and Year 7 Catch up? Ofsted will be looking for how you are supporting your new Year 7. The 2019 Ofsted Inspection Handbook says: In evaluating progress in literacy and mathematics, inspectors will take into account the progress of those for whom the Year 7 literacy and numeracy catch-up premium provides support. [In Outstanding schools,] Governors systematically challenge senior leaders so that the effective deployment of … Year 7 literacy and numeracy catch-up premium … secures excellent outcomes for pupils. In Outstanding Schools.. The following quotes are taken from Ofsted Inspection Reports of Outstanding secondary and all-through schools in 2018/19: Leaders use additional funding very effectively for disadvantaged pupils and those in Year 7 who need extra help to catch up with others. … Year 7 pupils who join the school with low starting points are provided with targeted support to improve their reading. Pupils benefit from work that closely matches their abilities and...
Read More

Ofsted Curriculum: Intent and Implementation

The new Ofsted Inspection Framework speaks a lot about Curriculum. Whilst the new directed focus has been welcomed, there is a lot of misunderstanding about what this means in practice. Schools are buying in help from outside sources against Ofsted Advice and Ofsted are constantly claiming there is no "Ofsted curriculum". So what will inspectors be looking for in your school curriculum from September 2019 onwards? What do they mean by a good or outstanding "quality of education"? In this article, we hope to help answer these questions by looking at Amanda Spielman's recent speech, the results of the Ofsted research project and the Ofsted School inspection Handbook. Amanda Spielman In a recent speech (10th July) at the Victoria and Albert Museum, Amanda Spielman was discussing the Ofsted research into Curriculum and what this means moving forward. The quality of education judgement does consider how well pupils are doing in national assessments and qualifications. But this should be the reflection of what children...
Read More

Progress 8 Bandings

In early 2017 the DfE categorised schools into 5 different Progress Bandings: But it is easy to get things wrong. BBC News website The BBC News website did so on 16 April 2019, when it said: A school's performance is measured through pupils' progress, called Progress 8, via a scoring system of between -1 and 1, with the average being 0.A score lower than 0 is recognised as not achieving the minimum standard expected by the government, with -1 being well below average. There are three things are wrong with these two sentences: Firstly, Progress 8 is not a scoring system of between -1 and 1. There are no such arbitrary limits, and in 2018 there are 70 mainstream schools with a Progress 8 score below -1, and 50 schools above +1.A score lower than 0 is not recognised as achieving the minimum standard expected; that would be -0.50 (but only up to 2017/18).A progress score of -1 is not the threshold of "well...
Read More